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bomb. He saw students as having a role to play in damping the currents of impending conf lict by reaching out to one another.

In the address, which West entitled “Vive en Pace,” he broached “the awful urgency with which we face the question of international student cooperation . . . provided by consideration of the terrifying position in which the United States finds itself today. The United States may no longer be considered a balanced or balancing power in the scale of world politics, but exists as one of two great protagonists. . . .”

What follows in this keepsake is an excerpt from an address he delivered in August, 1950, at the SecondWorld Student Congress of the International Union of ‘students (IUS)in Prague, Czechoslovakia, as spokesman for a three person observer delegation sent by U.S. National Student Association. The event took place shortly after the outbreak of the Korean War. Czechoslovakia had succumbed to a Communist coup two years earlier. Dominated by delegations hostile to America’s entry in the war, “the thinking of the Soviet world,” as his fellow observer Bill Holbrook put it,West faced a supreme challenge to get his message across before the thousands of delegates who had filled the meeting hall.

The excerpt from that speech that appears here is taken from the anthology and sourcebook,

viii ❖❖ Robert L. West

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