Page 39 - 00_Instructional Coaching_8-2-11

This is a SEO version of 00_Instructional Coaching_8-2-11. Click here to view full version

« Previous Page Table of Contents Next Page »

Chapter 1: The Benefts of Coaching in Education 13

coaching without the beneft of training has meant that these coaches have not—because they did not know how—impacted student achievement.

The Skills of Instructional Coaches

As described in Chapter 4, the role of instructional coach, while it varies from place to place and title to title, nevertheless has specifc functions and requires a certain set of skills to become effective. Primary among these skills is the ability to maneu-ver from serving as a peer coach to a role somewhat similar to that of a supervisor, then to facilitate, and then to take on a training function. Working as partners, the coach, principal, teacher, and student can observe and identify student behaviors that cause learning to occur—behaviors that will lead students, motivate them, and afford opportuni-ties to expend effort to learn. Once guided to those behaviors, students will achieve the goal on their own.

Teachers do not create student achievement; students do. Yet teachers, with the support of other dedicated professionals, can together create the environment and the platform from which students can do what they do best: learn, achieve, create, and innovate into the future. Despite all the discus-sion of issues in education, all can agree that the world seriously needs and wants students to succeed. Giving them every bit of support to do so behooves us as a nation and as a planet. But frst things frst. Chapter 2 describes the proven and successful model of peer coaching. Peer coaching serves as a base—a fundamental —of most coaching relationships or programs. It

Page 39 - 00_Instructional Coaching_8-2-11

This is a SEO version of 00_Instructional Coaching_8-2-11. Click here to view full version

« Previous Page Table of Contents Next Page »