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Chapter 1: The Benefts of Coaching in Education 7

who achieve a promotion or advancement: a raise in salary, the corner offce, and an executive coach. The coaching relationship is usually a one-on-one process, although in some organizations individual coaching is followed by a group session in which all are familiar with the methodology. Coaches are brought in for specifc skill or performance issues among employees; they are used as an intervention process. New people in an organization may receive a mentor or a coach, and as long-term and high-capacity personnel retire from the workforce, coaches are brought in to work with successors to their positions.

Coaching can be cognitive—focused on a specifc learning event. It can be co-active, focused on the coachee’s desire to act on various aspects of his or her life. There is collegial coaching among co-workers, technical coaching , challenge coaching , and

instructional coaching , all focused on working with others to improve specifc aspects of one’s profes-sional life. Life coaches stem from the executive or professional coach realm, with the object of enhancing a person’s life balance and fulfllment. There are also somatic coaches , working with the body; spiritual coaches; marriage coaches; and many others.

Whatever the coaching relationship, it involves a partnership between the coach and the client or coachee. Professional coaches typically charge by the session or the month, and are available to respond to whatever immediate needs their clients face on a path to self-improvement, overcoming obstacles, or enhancing and expanding on the circumstances in which they live or work.

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