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Chapter 1: The Benefts of Coaching in Education 5

do homework, no meal for breakfast or lunch, or both. They work with overworked parents and underfunded schools, buying needed supplies out of their own pockets—those same pockets that are being eyed by the public as possibly too full, imply-ing that teachers are overpaid. Teachers often serve as social workers, nurses, psychologists, and surrogate parents. More and more, they need to be multicultural in their approach, understanding and speaking languages they never heard of in graduate school.

Most importantly, educators are charged with imparting skills and knowledge so that students can succeed in a future that shifts and moves so rapidly they no longer have any idea what it will be like in the workplace, in society, or around the globe when their students are adults. In short, those who point fngers at teachers or suggest that the only thing needed in education today is the betterment of teaching are missing the incredibly intricate entanglement that education presents today.

In the face of all this, of course, teachers become defensive, juggling their own priorities of teaching with an increasingly unhappy citizenry. As they strive to be part of the solution in education, they are often tossed in as part of—or even the cause of—the problem. It’s no wonder that a third of newly hired teachers leave during their frst three years and nearly half give up during the frst fve. 2 This is a sad statistic. A fresh, new, eager teacher goes into educa-tion for the love of children and teaching students, only to be slammed up against political, fnancial, and social issues he or she never contemplated.

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