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Instructional Coaching with the End in Mind xii

science coach, and they may work with teachers on instruction in all content areas. The relationship is results-based. Instructional coaches are often hired as such, and do not necessarily work as classroom teachers. They, too, fall into the roles of telling as well as asking: learning the coachee’s agenda and guiding toward improvement in areas the coachee may not be aware of.

The role of instructional coach combines the roles of peer coaching and mentoring into one. The roles often overlap in terminology and per-ceived functions, but instructional coaches are there to make sure that in the end there is student achievement. The instructional coach often part-ners with the principal, and together they decide a course of coaching for a teacher. When a coachee opts not to follow the suggestions of his or her coach in a peer-coaching relationship, the coach would understand and move on to another coachee. In instructional coaching, the coach would persevere and continue working with the coachee until some success is realized. The in-structional coach, therefore, takes on a greater responsibility and needs a broader and deeper skill set—plus a sense of authority.

Both peer coaches and instructional coaches are valuable, and certainly my work continues with both types of coaches. Beyond developing more fully the role of instructional coaching, this book looks at the value and power of its application in collaboration among teachers, administrators, professional staff developers, and other school leaders. It looks at blending instructional coaching and student achievement through avenues such as

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