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Introduction xi

little or no feedback or support for their practices, their skills, and their delivery of learning.

My reason for embracing coaching as a specialty stems from the realization that, unlike my own experience of receiving support during my teaching years and the huge value I have experienced by collaborating with my colleagues at PLS, many teachers work in isolation.

When I wrote Quality Teaching in a Culture of Coaching in 2005 (and the second edition in 2010), its content represented these 30-plus years of experience in working on coaching programs and practices with educators. Most of my focus was on peer coaching and mentoring.

Peer coaching involves teachers working in each other’s classrooms, providing feedback as an exten-sion of a teacher’s personal and professional de-velopment. It is relationship-based and grounded more in asking than in telling—the teacher asks for coaching on specifc skills. Sometimes peer coaching connects to a systemwide or buildingwide coaching effort; at other times it is created by individual teachers working on skills or behaviors they want addressed based on their own specifc needs or desires.

While similar in process, mentoring differs from peer coaching in that the relationship is not always on an equal footing. The mentor has some respon-sibility to take more of a directive role, telling as well as asking. What has changed today and grown over the past few years is the emergence of a new type of coaching: instructional coaching . School-based instructional coaches sometimes wear the title of literacy coach or reading coach, math or

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