Page 40 - Latino Boom II

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l a t i n o b o o m I I
Much debate goes on every day about language preference and usage,
and the data runs the gamut. The problem is that there is no “uni-
versally agreed upon” definition for those terms, so it’s hard to really
know the truth, especially when language proficiency is self-reported.
Here’s an example. My cleaning lady, who is a Colombian immigrant
and has lived in New York City for the past ten years, would answer
yes to the question, “Do you consider yourself bilingual?” Granted, she
Total
Population
Non
Hispanic
Total
Hispanics
%
Entry in
Decade
Total
Hispanic
N/A (Born in the
U.S.)
265,214,606
235,250,111
29,964,495
Before 1950
562,718
437,653
125,065
0.6%
1950–1959
1,440,334 1,020,202
420,132
2.0%
1960–1969
2,766,749
1,619,409 1,147,340
5.5%
1970–1979
4,773,461
2,696,219 2,077,242
10.0%
1980–1989
8,089,636 4,144,238 3,945,398
19.0%
1990–1999
11,628,439 5,843,264 5,785,175
27.9%
2000 or later
14,873,746 7,609,023 7,264,723
35.0%
Year of Entry
Total
44,135,083
23,370,008
20,765,075
% Native
vs.
Foreign
Born
Native
269,432,814 237,520,349 31,912,465
63%
Foreign born
39,916,875 21,099,770 18,817,105
37%
Source: American Community Survey 2010 1 Year Estimates
Figure 3.21