Page 35 - Latino Boom II

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P o r t r a i t o f L a t i n o U . S . A .
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doing their part by contributing 131 births every
hour
, according to
a calculation from Nielsen, based on census population projections.
However, Hispanic and Asian birth rates have slowed down recently,
which has been attributed largely to the lagging economy and a slow
down in immigration.
In Figure 3.15 you can see that, even if immigration came to halt, the
Latino population would continue to grow in the United States, thanks
to our high birth rates, which account for one out of every four children
born in the United States today.
H I S P AN I C HOU S E HO L D I NCOM E S
Historically, the Latino population has always been thought of as a
“poor” population, but new studies show that, in fact, it is quickly climb-
ing up the socioeconomic ladder. In spite of the fact that the Great
Recession (2007–2009) has hit many hard, according to Steve Moya,
a senior advisor at the Santiago Solutions Group, today 40 percent of
Hispanic households earn $50,000 or more.
8
Figure 3.16 shows you how
Hispanic median household incomes compare to other race groups cat-
egorized by the 2010 census.
Figure 3.15