Page 26 - Latino Boom II

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l a t i n o b o o m I I
counts per country, as well as the change seen from 2000 to 2010, with
Mexicans leading the pack, representing over 31 million Latinos in the
U.S.
When analyzing the 2010 census data, it is interesting to note that
the three main country groups actually increased in size from the 2000
census, in spite of the fact the immigration nearly came to halt during
the Great Recession. That just speaks to the power of the Latino baby
boom. The total Mexican population increased 54 percent to 31.8 mil-
lion, from 20.6 million in 2000. Puerto Ricans grew 36 percent, from
3.4 million in 2000 to 4.6 million in 2010, and the Cuban population
increased 44 percent, from 1.2 million to 1.8 million in 2010. The “other
Hispanics” group slowed down significantly from 2000–2010, only
growing by 22 percent, from 10 million to 12.3 million.
G E OG R A P H I C CONC E N T R A T I ON
The geographic concentration of the Hispanic population has always
been an advantage for marketers, because it enables them to reach this
Figure 3.5