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The Shatzkin Fi les  15

what editions were available of them. As I heard the story (and Tom may read this and correct me), Tom said to Len: “I get it; we’ll fgure out which books haven’t been done and do those.” To which Len said, “No. We have the strong sales force. We pick the ones that everybody does, because those are the ones that sell [no BookScan back then; no B&N or Amazon either]. We’ll push somebody else of the shelf.” Anyhow, Dolphin was a big success. Two other things about those times:

Buying a paperback houses was seen as the way to get into the paperback business because of the perceived need of a backlist to be viable. That was the way to get one.

Mass markets really were paperbacks. The trade paperback business was small and academic. And mass market was distributed through IDs.

Well, Len didn’t believe in ID distribution; he believed it was inher-ently inefcient and the mass market business would ultimately choke on its growth. (It took 20 or 30 years for that to become obvious, but he was right.) So he wanted to create a paperback line which created its

own outlets, using the same rack-jobbing (inventory selection) tech-niques he had developed for the Doubleday Merchandising Plan. Len also thought he had a beter way to get to a backlist than to buy one. He would create one by publishing a very large number of titles—50 new ones per month. The plan was to do this for three years which would give him 1800 titles in print. Presto, instant backlist. Ray Hagel, the CEO of the Crowell-Collier Publishing Company, was recruiting Len from Doubleday and bought into this idea. Hagel was early in the curve of the go-go 60s, acquiring companies with stock. While Len was there, he acquired Macmillan Publishing, Free Press of Glencoe (bringing the soon-to-be-legendary Jeremiah Ka-plan to New York publishing), Brentano’s Bookstores, and, if memory serves, a planetarium-creating company in Baltimore. And he f-nanced Len’s vision: a new company called Collier Books. So, starting in about early 1962 I think, a box of 50 new Collier Books titles would arrive at our house every month. And did for about a year or so. Collier Books started branching out. They created Mod-ern Masters for Young People, children’s books from famous authors (Robert Graves, Louis Untermeyer) in a series overseen by a young neophyte editor named Harlin Quist, who also later made quite a name for himself publishing original children’s books. They had a line of study guides. They started publishing hardcovers. They even

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