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The Shatzkin Fi les  9

night, it would have been the end of his political career. As it was, it was the start.

Dick was at the University of Rochester in the 1950s, deeply in-volved in the New York Stevenson campaigns in 1952 and 1956. In 1954, Dick collaborated on the history brief for the historic Brown versus the Board civil rights case.

In 1960, he was an important player in JFK’s successful run for the White House. Dick had a story about working in West Virginia and complaining at one point to Robert Kennedy about the lack of contact between the West Virginia campaign and the national ofce. RFK’s response was to give Dick a roll of dimes and to tell him to call when-ever he needed to check in.

What proved to be one of the most dazzling demonstrations of Dick’s insight and prescience came at a Yankee-White Sox double-header we went to during the summer of 1971. While we watched the full two games, Dick laid out the McGovern strategy to get the 1972 nomination. Dick said we would come close in New Hamp-shire which would take the shine of Muskie’s inevitability; New Hampshire was a home state for a Maine senator. Then we’d win the Wisconsin primary, which would knock Muskie out because his top-down campaign couldn’t run without a constant fow of money. The key to understanding how this couldwork, the Professor ex-plained, was to know that polls were meaningless in primaries because of low turnouts—10% or 15%was not uncommon—and that, with our superior canvassing and volunteer operation, we could drive up the turnout among OUR supporters to achieve what we needed inNew Hampshire. We needed about 20,000 votes to do it. This was in July, and the NewHampshire primary was eight months away. McGovern at that point ranked last or near last in every national poll, registering about 2% support. But Dick’s explanationmade the challenge seemmanageable, which it was. And his scenario played out precisely.

What I think was the most sensational achievement of Dick’s politi-cal career came in 1974. Howard Samuels had co-chaired McGovern’s post-convention NY State Campaign, alongside Dick’s good friend, ex-Mayor Robert Wagner. I don’t know exactly what the root of the problem was, but I do know Dick and Samuels didn’t like each other. This was a unique situation; I am not aware of Dick having animus like that for anybody else, but he didn’t like Howard Samuels. In 1974, Samuels had an apparent hammerlock on the Demo-cratic nomination for Governor. He had the designation of the State

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